School District Economic Impact

What are the economic benefits of funding your school district?

Traditionally, the benefits of funding public education have been measured over the long-term. As students graduate from high school and enter the workforce or attend college, they contribute back to society and their communities through both civic engagement (e.g. voting and volunteering) and financial support (e.g. paying taxes to fund social security or donations to charitable organizations). Beyond public education’s long-term benefits, there are more immediate economic impacts that school districts have on their communities. Until now, no one has measured them systematically.

ASBO New York has developed a tool that measures the economic impact of funding your school district. This analysis uses a multiplier calculated by economists that measures both the direct and spillover impact of school district spending in terms of employment, income and taxes generated. Local and regional numbers are presented in millions while statewide numbers are presented in billions. A list of key terms and model methodology can be found at the bottom of this page.

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Please select your school district from the dropdown menu.

 

Local Impact
Direct Spillover Total
Employment (FTE)
Income
Income Tax
Sales Tax

 

Regional Impact
Direct Spillover Total
Employment (FTE)
Income
Income Tax
Sales Tax

 

Statewide Impact
Direct Spillover Total
Employment (FTE)
Income
Income Tax
Sales Tax

 


Conclusion

This analysis shows the economic impact of public education goes far beyond the people directly employed by school districts. School district spending in 2017-18 resulted in an estimated 600,000 jobs around the state. There are 358,000 jobs directly funded by schools and another 242,000 jobs that result from spending of school districts and school employees. As voters go to the polls to decide on school budgets, they should consider both the long-term benefits of funding public education and the immediate economic impact of school district spending.

Economic Impact Model Methodology and Key Terms

Please contact Andrew Van Alstyne, Deputy Director of Education and Research, at andrew@asbonewyork.org if you have any questions about this tool.